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Bhatt Murphy Solicitors

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Our People

We enjoy a collaborative style of working at Bhatt Murphy. We share our skills with one another and discuss our cases to achieve the best possible service for our clients. All the lawyers in the firm are skilled in both public and private law litigation.

Our lawyers are recognised experts in their fields and contribute to the progressive development of the law through training other lawyers and publishing their work.

Bhatt Murphy is unique in seeing itself as one team with everyone working together. We have a number of areas of particular expertise.

Police Law

Raju Bhatt, Mark Scott, Tony Murphy, Shamik Dutta, Carolynn Gallwey, Chanel Dolcy, Jed Pennington , Megan Phillips, Michael Oswald, Sophie Naftalin and Jessie Waldman work with individuals who have been victims of police misconduct or unfair decision making by the police.

Prison Law

Simon Creighton, Hamish Arnott and Jane Ryan work with prisoners on their rights whilst in prison custody and whilst on licence after release. They advise on all aspects of imprisonment and work particularly closely with people serving life sentences.

Immigration Detention

Mark Scott, Hamish Arnott, Shamik Dutta, Carolynn Gallwey, Janet Farrell, Jed Pennington , Sophie Naftalin and Jane Ryan work with those who have been detained in immigration detention on their rights whilst in immigration detention and after release. They advise on the legality of the detention and the conditions imposed.

Inquest Law

All the lawyers in the firm represent bereaved families who are have suffered the loss of a loved one in controversial circumstances. We advise on all aspects of preparing for an inquest and challenging decisions reached in relation to the investigation of the death and the conduct of the inquest.

European Law

All the lawyers in the firm are skilled in bringing cases before the European Court of Human Rights in the event that domestic remedies have not resolved the problem.
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